100783: The Session Rating and Outcome Rating Scales

Brief Measures for Clinical Practice

About the Course:

Article 1: The Session Rating Scale
Over 1,000 research findings (Orlinsky, Ronnestad, & Willutzki, 2003) demonstrate that a positive alliance is one of the best predictors of outcome. Paradoxically, despite the robust connection between the alliance and outcome, no alliance measures have been developed specifically as clinical tools for therapists to use on a day to day basis with their clients. This article describes the development and validation of an ultra-brief alliance measure, the Session Rating Scale Version 3 (SRS). The instrument’s psychometric properties are examined and reported. Based on experience with the instrument at the various sites in the study, the feasibility of the scale is also considered. Results indicate that the SRS, a clinical rather than research tool, represents a balanced tradeoff between the reliability and validity of the longer research measures, and the feasibility of this brief scale. Results and implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed.

Article 2: The Outcome Rating Scale
Industry-wide, there is trend toward making outcome evaluation a routine part of therapeutic services. While various multi-dimensional assessments of outcome are valid and reliable, their methodological complexity, length of administration, and cost often render them infeasible for many service providers and settings. The present article describes the development and validation of an ultra-brief outcome measure, the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS). The instrument’s psychometric properties are examined and reported for both clinical and non-clinical samples. Based on experience with the instrument at the various sites in the study, the feasibility of the scale is considered. Results indicate that the ORS represents a balanced tradeoff between the reliability and validity of the longer measures, and the feasibility of this brief scale. Results and implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed.

Author

Scott D. Miller, Ph.D. and Barry L. Duncan Psy. D.

About the Author:

Scott D. Miller, Ph.D. and Barry L. Duncan Psy. D. are co-founders of the Institute for the Study of Therapeutic Change, Chicago, a private group of clinicians and researchers dedicated to studying ‘what works’ in treatment.

Recommended For:

This course is recommended for social workers, counselors, psychologists, and other human services and behavioral health professionals who seek knowledge about Ultra-Brief Measures outcome measure for Clinical Practice. It is appropriate for participants with intermediate to advanced levels of knowledge about the topic.

Course Objectives:

  1. describe the potential benefits of frequently measuring \”working alliance\” and client outcomes.

  2. describe the development, validation, and psychometric properties of the SRS and ORS.

  3. identify clinical practice implications of using the SRS and ORS.

Exam Questions

All exam questions for the course are visible on this page for members of CE-credit.com.

Membership is free, and you can sign up today! You'll only pay when you're ready to purchase a course, or if you take advantage of the Unlimited Package.

If you're already a member, please login to see the exam questions for this and all other courses.

Exam-related Actions