102266: The Validity of DSM-5 Severity Specifiers for Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and Binge-Eating Disorder

About the Course:

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) introduced specifiers to characterize mild, moderate, and extreme levels of severity using different criteria for each eating disorder diagnostic category. However, little research has examined the validity of these specifiers. Given that it is imperative to ensure that these specifiers accurately characterize severity of EDs, this article aimed to assess the concurrent and predictive validity of these specifiers in anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED) samples by assessing the degree to which DSM-5 severity groups (i.e., mild, moderate, severe, and extreme) differed on levels of eating and related psychopathology.

Journal/Publisher:

International Journal of Eating Disorders

Publication Date:

September 2017

Author

Kathryn E. Smith, PhD

About the Author:

Kathryn E. Smith, PhD is psychologist at the Neuropsychiatric Research Institute. Kathryn received her PhD in 2014 and is currently completing her post-doctoral fellowship with the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Her research interests include eating disorders, and eating psychopathology in treatment.

Course Objectives:

  1. Describe how the DSM-5 currently characterizes severity across eating disorder diagnoses

  2. Describe the evidence that supports/does not support the use of DSM-5 severity specifiers in eating disorders.

  3. Describe the limitations of this study and potential alternatives to characterizing symptom severity.

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